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Month: June 2010

Interview with Erik Wurster of E+Co

Interview with Erik Wurster of E+Co

In researching my article on carbon financing in the developing world, I had the opportunity to speak with Erik Wurster, the carbon finance manager at an organization called E+Co.  E+Co has been on the forefront of this industry and has been one of the leading innovators.  Newsweek recently highlighted their efforts to distribute clean-burning cookstoves – a topic I have discussed in this journal – in Ghana.  It provides a great overview of how this complicated process works.  In an…

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Zimbabwe’s Diamonds and the Natural Resource Trap

Zimbabwe’s Diamonds and the Natural Resource Trap

In my last post, I discussed why access to abundant natural resources is actually counterproductive to the development of poor countries.  The idea comes from Paul Collier, a development economist who penned the book The Bottom Billion, a summary of his findings from thirty years in the industry.  While much of the world lives below the poverty line, there are only a handful of countries that have made no progress in terms of economic development over the last few decades. …

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Oil Drilling in the Niger Delta

Oil Drilling in the Niger Delta

In a little-known story from the southeastern United States, a large oil rig recently exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, releasing a nominal amount of mildly polluting oil into ocean, killing a few birds and galvanizing retirees in Florida – a political sleeping giant – into action.  This minor environmental calamity, which can hardly be considered more than a nuisance, is indeed tragic, but it pales in comparison to what happens elsewhere in the world.  Take this article from the…

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Why Children Become Soldiers

Why Children Become Soldiers

“He should be in school,” said Awil’s commander, Abdisalam Abdillahi. “But there is no school.” This is a topic I admittedly do not know too much about, so any discussion about it will be academic and speculative.  But I have been reading recently about the problem of child soldiers in the U.S.-backed government military in Somalia, where kids as young as 12 have picked up arms to fight.  A few months ago I took a 10-day jaunt through Myanmar, which…

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Electric Dirt

Electric Dirt

It is called “Dirt Power.”  Or, more specifically, as the scientists call it, a microbial fuel cell.  A team of undergraduate researchers at Harvard, a small liberal-arts university in New England, invented a battery that runs on dirt.  Actually, it runs on microbes that like to hang out and dine on the decaying organic matter that exists in the dirt.  The team that invented this technology – an organization called Lebone – won the MIT IDEAS competition and, recently, their…

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The Upside of Imperialism: Neo-Colonialism as a Strategy

The Upside of Imperialism: Neo-Colonialism as a Strategy

A while back, I discussed why China had been so successful at poverty alleviation during the 1980’s and 1990’s.  I surmised that it had something to do with China’s embrace of “state capitalism.”  In a recent article in the Atlantic Monthly, one economist suggests that, actually, it is Britain is ultimately responsible for bringing more than 100 million Chinese out of poverty over a ten-year period.  By exporting the laissez-faire, business-friendly city model of Hong Kong to urban centers throughout…

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Carbon Credit Financing in the Developing World

Carbon Credit Financing in the Developing World

I am in the process of researching an article about the impossibly complex topic of using carbon credits to finance small-scale energy ventures in the developing world.  The experience reminds me of a religion course I took in college on the Old Testament.  I was confident that my five years of Hebrew school (I graduated when I was 12) would be sufficient to land me a high grade without much effort.  Unfortunately, I found out (too late) that there are,…

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The Volatility of $2 a Day

The Volatility of $2 a Day

Portfolios of the Poor: How the World Lives on $2 a Day has become one of the most talked-about book in the world of development.  It is an analysis of how poor – specifically, the poorest – people live.  The authors chronicle how people make and spend their money – tracking the inflows and outflows to better understand the daily routine.  The subjects keep detailed financial diaries of everything having to do with money in their lives.  The results are…

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The Complexities of Poverty and Development Strategies

The Complexities of Poverty and Development Strategies

A recurring theme in this journal is the amount of self-criticism within the development community.  There is no shortage of critics of an academic mind to point out the flaws in an approach to development without offering a reasonable alternative.  One common criticism is that microfinance doesn’t really offer a sustainable long-term economic solution to the problem of poverty.  It is too focused on the individual and not enough on the big picture – what is good for the population…

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Where's My Money, Fool: Conditional Cash Transfers

Where's My Money, Fool: Conditional Cash Transfers

In this journal, I have discussed the different structural problems that a country faces in improving things like education, healthcare, and the economy overall.  A strong education system requires an adequate number of schools and teachers.  Likewise, good public health programs need to provide reasonable access to doctors and medical facilities.  Also, for healthcare in particular, people need to be educated about nutrition and preventive measures to avoid costly hospitalizations down the road.  But even with all of the components…

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