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Month: December 2011

Global Diasporas Create Economic Prosperity

Global Diasporas Create Economic Prosperity

The book review in the Wall Street Journal this morning discusses the Robert Guest book, Borderless Economics, which details how global labor movement increases trade, informational flow, communication, and technology.  The topic of migration has been making the rounds, partly due to book reviews of Borderless Economics in all the major journals and magazines, but also because the time is right for a frank discussion about the realities of a global economy. Develop Economies agrees with all of Guest’s points. …

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How to Use Data to Better Serve the BoP Market

How to Use Data to Better Serve the BoP Market

When I was a kid, my parents enrolled me in a program called “Science by Mail” through the Museum of Science in Boston.  The Museum would send me a kit.  Once I received a box containing balsa wood and glue with instructions to build a bridge that could hold as many pennies as possible. Fast forward 20 years, and I am pretty much doing the same thing.  For the last two years, I have been working at different non-profits and…

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Please Help: Tragedy in the Philippines

Please Help: Tragedy in the Philippines

Tragedy has struck the Philippines, my adopted second home.  From NPR: The United Nations is rushing food, shelter and clean water to the Philippines, following last weekend’s devastating tropical storm. The UN estimates about 1,000 people died when Tropical Storm Washi burst ashore last Friday on the big southern island of Mindanao. Washi, known as Sendong in the Philippines, may be the world’sdeadliest storm of 2011, according to Washington Postmeteorologist Jason Samenow. The system raked the southern Philippines islands, finally emerging…

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The U.S. Must Pay Its Debts to Its Iraqi Allies

The U.S. Must Pay Its Debts to Its Iraqi Allies

The following is a guest post from Sushmita Meka, a Masters of Public Policy candidate at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.  Previously, she worked as a research associate for the Centre for Microfinance at IMFR in Chennai, India and a fellow with FrontlineSMS:Credit in Nairobi, Kenya. It’s strange to think that the end of the Iraq war has come and gone so quietly, eight years after the fact. At a cost of $800 billion dollars and hundreds of thousands…

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Wal-Mart (Does Not) Come to India

Wal-Mart (Does Not) Come to India

There is a fierce debate going on right now in India about a new piece of legislation that that will allow multi-national corporations to operate as joint ventures in the country, owning up to 51%.  And a week ago, the Indian government backtracked and announced that it would not pass the legislation after all.  It is worth examining the potential pros and cons. There has been no shortage of voices from the left and right commenting about whether or not…

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Preventing the Next Pandemic with Cell Phones

Preventing the Next Pandemic with Cell Phones

Much is known about patient zero, allegedly the first carrier of HIV and catalyst for one of the greatest pandemics the world has ever known.  But the origins of the virus can be traced much further back than that.  The roots of the virus that has plagued humanity for the last three decades snake from the United States, through Haiti, and back to Africa, where all life began. A recent Radiolab show titled “Patient Zero” traces the virus from the…

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The Strategic Value of Burma

The Strategic Value of Burma

Myanmar’s state newspapers ran commentary warning Aung San Suu Kyi, the leader of the opposition democracy movement, that her continued political activity is unlawful and that her plan to tour the country could provoke chaos. The last time she toured the countryside her motorcade was attacked by a mob, apparently aligned with the government. Miss Suu Kyi was blamed for that incident. This quote comes from the “World this Week” section of the Economist from July 2nd, 2011, a little…

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