Monthly Archives: November 2010

The Aversion to Government-Run Development Programs

Andrew Sullivan of The Altlantic writes a popular blog about politics, economics, culture, and anything else he finds interesting or relevant at the moment.  With 20-30 posts today, it has the depth of a traditional blog and the breadth of … Continue reading

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The Pope Endorses Condom Use

In a possible Joe Biden moment, Pope Benedict allegedly softened his position on condom use in an interview with a German journalist this past summer.   His remarks are being hailed as groundbreaking, even though the context is decidedly limited. … Continue reading

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Reading: 11/14-11/20

1.  Foreign Aid for Scoundrels, William Easterly, New York Review of Books:  Government-to-government aid props up anti-democratic dictators to the detriment of the people.  Bono doesn’t want you to know how the sausage is made. 2.  Indian Microcredit Faces Collapse … Continue reading

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A New Chapter: Working with Technoserve in Ghana

In less than two weeks, I’ll be moving to Ghana to work as a consultant with an organization called Technoserve.  It is my first time to visit West Africa and am excited to learn about the region.  Technoserve works to … Continue reading

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Can Business Make a Difference in Poverty Alleviation? (Yes.)

Melinda Gates asks the question. It turns out that the corporations aren’t trying to enslave us into a life of servitude. Or, if they are, at least they are helping some people on the margins.

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The Long-Awaited Beard Update

While going through my normal Tuesday afternoon routine of looking at pictures of myself, I realized that it has been almost exactly one year since I began growing the beard. In fact, loyal followers of this blog know that regular … Continue reading

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Do Elections Improve Economic Policy? Democracy in Burma

Today, the people of Myanmar for the first time in twenty years will elect a new government.  Actually, they will simply participate in a rigged election process that will legitimize the repressive military regime that has controlled the country by … Continue reading

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Microbusinesses as Start-Ups and the Problem of Flexibility

In a blog post titled “The Rigidity of Microfinance,” Eva Pereira discusses how the structure of microfinance loans inherently stifle risk-taking among clients: Compared to loans in developed countries, microloans have far shorter repayment cycles, oftentimes as short as a … Continue reading

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Natural Gas in Papua New Guinea and Oil in Ghana

This is from the New York Times the other day: In 2014, ExxonMobil is scheduled to start shipping natural gas through a 450-mile pipeline, then on to Japan, China and other markets in East Asia. But the flood of revenue, which … Continue reading

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