Browsed by
Month: September 2011

China the Troublemaker

China the Troublemaker

Develop Economies often waxes philosophic from his armchair in Africa about China’s role in the development of the continent.  For some, the China love-fest is rooted in the fact that bilateral trade is not patronizing, unlike aid.  For others, China is a ruthless competitor – a less explicit colonialist than the Europeans.  In this journal, Develop Economies tries to remain neutral, presenting the facts.  But, in recent months, he has given a disproportionate amount of airtime to the views of…

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American Poverty, Single Parenthood, and the National Review

American Poverty, Single Parenthood, and the National Review

The New York Times published an article today discussing a disturbing trend: more than one in three young families – defined as under the age of 30 with children – is currently living in poverty.  This is the highest percentage on record for this group.  Some of the other statistics are not surprising – the highest rates of child poverty exist in black and Hispanic families, single-parent households, etc.  Here are the grim facts: Economists cited several reasons for the…

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How Burma Will Modernize

How Burma Will Modernize

The photo on the header of this blog was taken in Bagan, a city in the center of Burma that is home to thousands of ornate Buddhist temples.  I was sitting atop another of the thousand temples that litter the skyline, wondering how such a stunning place could have so few visitors.  The temples in Bagan are relics of a once-prosperous society.  Today, the country appears frozen in time, its potential ruined by a repressive military government that has left…

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Tragedy in Kenya

Tragedy in Kenya

Today, a gasoline explosion killed more than 100 people in a slum in Nairobi.  The ones who did not burn to death were left badly injured .  Here is a description of the scene from Jeffrey Gettleman: The whole slum seemed to spring into action, with men, women and children grabbing buckets, oil tins, battered yellow jerry cans — anything to carry the spilled fuel. Even minibuses raced in from miles away, looking for free gas, a small godsend in a place…

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