Monthly Archives: June 2011

The Unintended Consequences of Female Empowerment

In social sciences, unintended consequences are outcomes that are different from those expected.  In development, unintended consequences are common, and often negative by nature. As a generalization, there are two approaches to development: top-down and bottom-up.  The top-down approach, favored … Continue reading

Posted in Development Economics, Education | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Mobius Motors and Game-Changing Technologies in Africa

Problems generally have a cause and an effect.  Trying to solve a problem by focusing on the effects may reduce the impact, but, if the solution fails to address the underlying issues that make it a problem in the first … Continue reading

Posted in Development Economics, Energy, Social Enterprise | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Fewer Farms, Bigger Farms

Right now, the world is in the midst of a food crisis.  Some might contend that we never fully recovered from the food crisis of 2008, but what is certain is that food prices are rising.  The reason for the … Continue reading

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Insite: A Step Beyond a Needle Exchange

The following is a guest post by Shawn Zhou, a country program analyst with the Clinton Foundation on the Clinton Health Access Initiative in Shanghai, China. An interesting progressive model for combating HIV/AIDS has emerged over the past 5-10 years … Continue reading

Posted in Development Economics, Public Health | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

The Many Forms of Corruption

cor·rup·tion (n.): Dishonest or fraudulent conduct by those in power, typically involving bribery In Nairobi the other day, the police pulled over my taxi at a checkpoint.  There were four people in the backseat, so the officer beckoned me, seated … Continue reading

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The Evolution of Develop Economies

“Write without pay until somebody offers to pay you. If nobody offers within three years, sawing wood is what you were intended for.”- Mark Twain I think about this quote a lot, and by a lot, I mean once, two … Continue reading

Posted in Travel and Culture | 5 Comments

How Does Corruption in the Education Sector Work?

“There’s this standing joke about corruption in Asia: In the Philippines, everything is under the table; in Vietnam, it’s over the table; in Indonesia, it’s including the table.” – The Manila Standard The Philippines is ranked 139th out of 180 … Continue reading

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mHealth in Northern Ghana

This post originally appeared on Next Billion. “Some women feel they want to hide their pregnancy at the early stages. Maybe because they fear the ‘the evil eye,’ miscarriages, the unknown or visiting a midwife. These fears are normal. Here … Continue reading

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The Next Viral Video (Congrats to Anica and Navin)

Today I was cranking away at work at the way-cool iHub, when I got a message from a friend with a link to the Boston Globe.  When I opened it, I had to smile, since it is amazing.  A good friend, … Continue reading

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