Monthly Archives: October 2011

Up and Out: Income Inequality and Political Polarization in the U.S.

This graph is very interesting.  It tracks the degree of political polarization over time and plots it against the Gini coefficient, which is a measure of income inequality in a country.  Develop Economies frequently references the Gini coefficient when discussing … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Why DIY Foreign Aid Amateurs are Necessary

This is part two of a two-part post about amateurs vs. professional in aid and development. In my experience, development professionals tend to be a jaded and cynical bunch, but also eternally optimistic, well-meaning, and principled.  In one post, a … Continue reading

Posted in Development Economics, Social Enterprise | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Advice to the Amateurs: Ignore the Professionals

This is part one of a two-part post about the role of amateurs and professionals in aid and development. The other day, Develop Economies was asked to move to a different table at the iHub because a European government aid agency would … Continue reading

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The Obama Doctrine and Smart Power, Pt. 2

This is part two of a two-part post about the Obama administration’s approach to foreign policy and military intervention in Africa and the Middle East. The other day I discussed the first four points of Obama’s approach to military intervention … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

The Obama Doctrine and Smart Power, Pt. 1

This is part one of a two-part post about the Obama administration’s approach to foreign policy and military intervention in Africa and the Middle East. In an article titled “Inside Obama’s War Room” published in Rolling Stone this month, Michael … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy | 3 Comments

The Tea Party and American Foreign Policy

The Pew Research Center just released a report detailing the foreign policy views of democrats, republicans, and tea partiers.  Much of it is what you would expect.  For tea partiers the U.S. needs to be strong on defense and Israel, … Continue reading

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Africa Rising: Venture Capital on the Continent

This is a guest post from Ben Lyon, co-founder and VP of business development of Kopo-Kopo, a Nairobi-based software company enabling enterprises to accept mobile payments. A scan of tech investor blogs reveals two conflicting sentiments: 1) when the bubble bursts, … Continue reading

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