Monthly Archives: July 2011

Perceptions of China and the United States

A guaranteed way to bait someone into a contentious discussion in Nairobi is to ask for their opinion on the value of China’s activities in Africa and how the massive investment in infrastructure and buildings has and will contribute to … Continue reading

Posted in Development Economics, Foreign Policy | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Why is Income Inequality in the U.S at the Highest Level in 90 Years? A Brief History

Something strange is happening in the United States.  Parallel sets of reality exist, disconnected from one another in the discourse over issues like taxes, the tea party, and the debt ceiling.  In one reality, there is a very loud and … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy | 2 Comments

There Is a Famine in East Africa Right Now

The official definition of a famine: More than 30% of children must be suffering from acute malnutrition Two adults or four children must be dying of hunger each day for every group of 10,000 people The population must have access … Continue reading

Posted in Public Health | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

A Toaster in Every Kitchen: Growing Demand in Developing Nations

The chart above is a bit complicated, but remarkably interesting.  For a good explanation, read Felix Salmon.  For a below-average explanation of questionable veracity, keep reading.  This chart displays the ratio of two ratios.  The numerator is the P/E (price … Continue reading

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Technology Evolution and Revolution in Africa

Chances are you have never heard of the company Huawei.  Founded in 1988, this somewhat secretive Chinese company has become the fourth largest telecoms equipment and service company in the world, just a few billion in revenue behind Nokia.   … Continue reading

Posted in Development Economics, Foreign Policy, Social Enterprise | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

The China-Africa Trade Boom

The following is a guest post by Joseph Cox, an MA candidate at the Georgetown Public Policy Institute and managing editor of the The Inductive, a blog about U.S. economic and foreign policy. When polled, Americans always cite foreign aid … Continue reading

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Caylee’s Law and Irrational Legislation

Casey Anthony, the young mother accused of killing her two year-old daughter Caylee, was found not guilty of first-degree murder.  The world, it seems, is very angry that a young girl has been denied justice.  Unfortunately, the reaction will be … Continue reading

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Films about Africa: “Blood Diamond”

I watched the film “Blood Diamond” for the first time the other day.  For those who have not seen it, the movie is graphic, placing the horror of armed conflict in Africa on full display.  The director does not seem … Continue reading

Posted in Development Economics, Foreign Policy | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Saving as a Group

The following is a guest post by Gemma North, an associate with Saving for Change, a community finance program run by Oxfam America. ?In 2009, I worked for a microfinance institution called CREDIT in Cambodia.  On a field visit, I … Continue reading

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